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Friday, May 27, 2011 by Warren Buckley

Hiya,
As we are getting closer and closer to CodeGarden the buzz and hype surrounding it is growing on twitter and I think we can all agree on that this years CodeGarden is going to be far the best.

So to continue with our "Up close and personal" blog post series, I have spoken to some speakers to see what they
have to say about CodeGarden.

Doug Robar

Doug-Robar

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Did you Know?" Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: Knowing as much as possible about what Umbraco does very well and very easily helps me build better sites more quickly and with higher profits. As a long-time Umbraco user and #lazyweb I'm always interested in finding things I didn't know about Umbraco. Helpful tips. How-to's. Tidbits. Rules of thumb. Hidden gems. Best practices and examples of what-not-to-do. Folklore and history. All these things make the Umbraco project and the people involved in it even more special.

This is a fast-paced session for both new and experienced users. I'll be sharing a huge grab bag of stuff; everyone will find something they didn't know.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this years CodeGarden?

A: It's been said many times and I'll echo it again... the people! To be sure, CodeGarden is a great opportunity to learn about the latest Umbraco developments and learn from the gurus. But collaborating in real time, talking face to face with people from around the globe that I've only met online, getting excited by all the cool things others are doing with Umbraco and receiving encouragement and support for my own ideas and projects... what could be better?

I know we geeks are supposed to be socially inept. Maybe that's true in general, but not in the Umbraco community! I've trained hundreds of people and met hundreds more and I can tell you there's something very special and unique about the Umbraco community. These people aren't just decent, friendly folk. They are the kind of people I want to have as friends, to invite home, meet the family, and share a meal with. CodeGarden is the biggest gathering of my worldwide friends and colleagues. I wouldn't miss it for anything.

Oh, and I'll also go home with a bunch of new skills and code.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: Unconventionally, I'm really excited that so much is staying the same in v5. Site builders have learned the How's and Why's of Umbraco and won't be losing that investment with 5. What you know about document types, templates, macros, being a super hero to your users, all those foundational concepts and principles, the stuff you use in every site you build are totally applicable in v5. I'm thrilled that even though the internals are all new and greatly improved and we'll all benefit from that in v5 and beyond, the core concepts of what Umbraco is and does remains the same. Take a deep breath, bask in your existing Umbraco skills, and then dive deep into V5 at CodeGarden for even more greatness!

Darren Ferguson

Darren-Ferguson

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Multi Language Websites in Umbraco". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: Our session has two presenters - I'll be demonstrating the more traditional approach to multi language sites in Umbraco, including some information on the relations API. The whole demo is put together live with a bunch of Razor, with a few bad jokes thrown in for good measure. Dimitri, the other speaker has a bit more of an innovative approach to demonstrate it. I've not seen it yet, so I'm looking forward to being a spectator for part of the presentation. Finally - we'll open up to Q&A at the end.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: Catching up with old friends and hopefully making some new ones. It is always nice to meet the people that you've communicated with in the Umbraco community in the past year. Hopefully we'll be blessed with the usual CodeGarden weather this year - there is nothing quite like sitting out on the lawn at the venue with a beer - talking geek.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: Hive (storage agnostic persistence) looks great - but just the re-architecture in general. I'm less fascinated by the fact that it is MVC and more interested in the fact that the project has an extremely competent full time architect this time around. Hopefully the team will be kept off the beer to avoid any more "Grapper" namespaces :)

Dimitri Kourkoulis

Dimitri-Kourkoulis

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Multi Language Websites in Umbraco". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: Actually I am going to share a session with Darren Ferguson, on multi-language web sites in Umbraco. For my part of the session, I will be demonstrating a method of providing and managing multilingual content without relying on multiple sites.

In the environment where I work, it is very important to offer the exact same structure of information to all visitors, regardless of their choice of language. When we started using Umbraco, most of the documentation we were able to find on the subject proposed setting up multiple sites within an Umbraco installation, one for each of the supported languages. We needed to support many languages and we thought that going about doing things this way would pose two risks; that publishing multi-lingual content simultaneously would be hard to manage and also that different visitors would see different versions of the site, when for example certain translations are not ready as fast as others or even due to human error.

So we realised that what we needed was what was often referred to as a "1:1 multilingual site structure". We found some information about how to implement this in Umbraco. Over time, also taking feedback from our users into consideration, we evolved the method and today we are quite happy with it.

I will be explaining to the audience how such a system can be set up and, most importantly, demonstrate that this is a viable solution, perfectly feasible to implement in Umbraco. I hate to spoil the suspense but I have already made a package with this method and have posted it on our.umbraco.org. I think that, using the package, some time will be saved so that I can focus on how the method solves problems, rather than going into too many development details.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this years CodeGarden?

A: This will be my first year at CodeGarden, so I am not sure exactly what to expect. I have enjoyed the BUUG festival which I have attended in Belgium. It was very informative and it was nice to meet members of the Umbraco community for the first time. I know that CodeGarden is a very big event for Umbraco, so I am looking forward to being there, getting to know the community even better and, of course, to find out as much as possible about version 5.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: I am sure that there are many details about V5 that I do not know yet, but from what I am aware of so far, I would say that Hive is the most exciting thing for me. It is very often that one has to link to external data sources these days, so anything that helps towards this end is certainly good news!

Niels Kühnel

Niels-Kuhnel

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Forget About Resource Strings. Umbraco.Foundation.Localization". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: It's about how to manage all the "micro content" you have in a website. That is, how Umbraco 5 helps you and the end users manage all the small texts, validation messages etc you have in your templates and code. As a bonus the localization framework is compatible with all (spoken) languages in the world so it will help you in the frontend when you're doing multi language homepages. It also supports a lot of different text sources which will help your work flow in the development phase. Come see the texts in the backoffice be changed from a Google Spreadsheet.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: Meeting up with everyone in the same time zone and sharing ideas in an informal atmosphere without a 140 character limit is something I'm really looking forward to.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: The Hive. The unified approach to handling all the data sources that make up a modern website the same way is simply brilliant. Apart from that, the fantastic and solid approach to content management that has evolved and matured in the world's friendliest community over the years now runs off world class code and architecture. It's highly unlikely that any single company could ever encapsulate that amount of talent, brilliance and experience in a product.

Anders Burla Johansen

Anders-Burla-Johansen

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "The E-Commerece Showdown". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: This session will introduce you to three different e-commerce solutions for Umbraco - Tea Commerce, uCommerce and Commerce for Umbraco. You will be explained the possibilities with the various systems, their strengths and which system is best suited for specific scenarios. It will be an intense session, as each presenter only has 15 minutes to present their system, giving You the best tools and knowledge to build your next e-commerce solution with Umbraco. At the end of the session we will have a 15 min Q&A - so prepare your e-commerce questions and we will have the answers.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: Meeting the entire Umbraco community - meeting familiar faces, new ones, and faces I only know from a Twitter profile. And of course the Umbraco Bingo - wondering what surprises the team has arranged this year!

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: As a package developer, I'm most excited to see how you build third party packages with the new API. I want to see how the new stuff works under the hood, how easy it is and what new possibilities it gives.

Søren Spelling Lund

Soren-Spelling-Lund

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden, titled "The E-Commerce Showdown" can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: We're taking a look at what makes uCommerce 2.0 tick, when it makes sense to use it, and what you can expect when you do decide to use it. We'll cover the new Marketing Foundation and what it brings to the table to help you build advanced e-commerce solutions. Basically how you'll discover how to build awesome e-commerce solutions with Umbraco. Plus we'll have a couple of cool surprises in store for attendees at this session, so remember to sign up today :)

Q: What are you most looking forward to, at this years CodeGarden?

A: For me personally the high point of CodeGarden is always meeting old and new Umbracians and catching up from last year. It's always a treat to meet the talented people working with Umbraco out there.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: The big thing is getting an honest to god architecture for Umbraco and the opportunities it will bring for cool new features in Umbraco itself and uCommerce, of course. The Hive looks especially promising for integrating custom data in an even more seamless fashion that what we can do today.

We may be bias, but we loved reading through the different session synopsis, and especially people's individual and unique reasons why they love attending CodeGarden and what they are anticipating most about the new version 5 release.... one of the main focus' of this years conference. If you have yet to purchase your ticket, head over to the Umbraco site, there are limited tickets left. Once you've secured one, come back here and leave a comment telling us what YOU are looking forward to most at CG11.

Monday, May 23, 2011 by Warren Buckley

Hello again.
Following on from the success of the ' Up close and personal interviews with the CodeGarden speakers', we thought it would be a great idea to do a follow up post, asking the same questions to more of our fantastic CG11 line up.

Tim Geyssens

Tim-Geyssens

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden, titled "Contour Strikes Again". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: After last year's introductory session to Contour (our official form builder) I'm diving deeper into the possibilities. Taking Contour a lot further then a simple contact form and showing how you can use it for polls, voting forms, quizzes, registrations and much much more. You'll see that it takes only minimal effort and you end up with reusable components that can save you a lot of valuable time.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: It's hard to pick a single favorite...  For me it's the combination of interesting sessions, being around the who's who in the Umbraco world, and catching up with old and new friends that makes CodeGarden an incredible and not-to-be-missed event.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: I can't wait to see the first sites running on V5 and the community creating extensions and packages.

Per Ploug Hansen

Per-Ploug-Hansen

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Team Development with and/or without Courier 2.0".  Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: Well, in the last couple of years, we've seen massive adoption of Umbraco in big corporations who have big development teams, big editorial teams, or both.
With these new users, we are also seeing new usage patterns. Like running Umbraco in multiple instances to handle development, testing, staging or content approval. This has so far been really complicated, due to the Umbraco 4 architecture.
So my talk is about how teams have handled this so far, what are the lessons learned and suggested best practices.
Based on these common scenarios, I will show two things with Courier 2:

  1. How developers can add new features to a test instance, transfer the modifications to a staging environment, without worrying about database merges, dependencies or development files.
  2. How editorial teams can work on content on an internal instance and push content revisions to a live site, without any technical knowledge.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: Catching up with old friends and meeting new ones. Also, looking forward to seeing the core team present their baby to the world. I know they are extremely proud of what they've made, so it will be great to see it presented to the public.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: I've yet to actually look into the technical details of V5, but to me, it's massive that we get to MVC, get all the underlying code cleaned-up, and still stick with the tried and true formula that has made Umbraco such a big success.

Martin Beeby

Martin-Beeby

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden, titled "Azure & Umbraco" Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: I'm going to be talking about how and why Microsoft used Umbraco and the Azure cloud computing platform to get a UK Tech.Days registration site live. It was a pet project for me and I learnt a lot about Umbraco and Azure along the way which I'd like to share.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: I am really fascinated to learn more about Version 5, being an MVC developer I'm really excited by the direction Umbraco is taking. It's my first CodeGarden so I am looking forward to meeting everybody, if it's as welcoming and as friendly as the Umbraco UK Festival was last year then I know I am going to have a great time.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: MVC and support for Azure are major wins for me, I'm itching to find out more and dig deeper into the new features at CodeGarden.

Aaron Powell

Aaron-Powell

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Collaboration in Umbraco" and "0 to Hive in 45". Can you tell us what these sessions will be about?

A: This year has seen a lot of exciting changes in Umbraco, from a developer on the project's point of view. First off we moved away from TFS and this saw something exciting... a lot of commits from the community. This was everything from fixing bugs to expanding existing core features. Ultimately though Mercurial is still a foreign concept to many developers and it can be a bit tricky to get started, so I want to share why it has worked so well for Umbraco and how you too can get started with it.
On the last day I'll be co-presenting with Alex Norcliffe a session in which we'll be diving into the deep new layers of V5. There's a lot to cover in this session, it'll probably be fairly hectic talk as there's a lot to cover! Alex has already given a good synopsis in his interview - /follow-us/blog-archive/2011/5/17/up-close-and-personal-with-the-codegarden'11-speakers

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

A: One of the things I'm most looking forward to is getting to meet all the people I know through Twitter, our.umbraco, etc. It's always exciting to meet people who you chat to in a virtual environment face-to-face. And as always I'm looking forward to seeing what craziness the HQ team has come up with, every year there seems to be something new and wacky brought to the conference.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: I'd have to say I'm most excited about the possibility of interacting with your own data in a much simpler fashion. It's always been possible to extend Umbraco to work with your own data inside Umbraco but it has never been a simple task and more often than not you had to work around tricky limitations within the core of Umbraco.

Adi Molina

Adi-Molina

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Spicing Up Umbraco". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: "Spicing-Up-Umbraco" encompasses clever ways of transforming Umbraco instances into a client-driven application by applying a few techniques, such as adding new sections, creating your own trees, and tailoring the user interface to fit the exact needs of a client. The session will also highlight the concept behind the Umbraco content management system developed for FOX International Channels: a global publishing platform that features multilingual websites, all under one abstract, product-independent application built for television networks such as FOX, FX and The National Geographic Channel.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this year's CodeGarden?

Being my first CodeGarden, I am stoked to get to meet, learn from and share ideas with the Umbraco community as well as the Umbraco core. I'm eager to attend the sessions encompassing Jupiter and Umbraco's next steps and future plans. But most of all, I'm looking forward to the Boat Party of course!

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

The idea that Jupiter switched over to MVC makes it particularly interesting. As developers, we can definitely take advantage of MVC's incredible features in order to create even friendlier, sophisticated interfaces and help us automate tasks efficiently. I cannot wait to spice-up v5!

Sebastiaan Janssen

Sebastiaan-Janssen

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden titled "Macros - XSLT & The Razor Way". Can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: I like toying with new technologies so I've been very active in using Razor in Umbraco even before it was released. Before that I used to use XSLT almost exclusively as I felt UserControls were not very beneficial for my productivity. Developers now have an interesting choice, as Razor and XSLT are similar tools. My talk will focus on the good bits of both Razor and XSLT and when you would use which.

Q: What are you most looking forward to, at this years CodeGarden?

A: What I love about CodeGarden every time is talking with great people who have great ideas about Umbraco and software development in general. But I'm also really excited to learn all about Umbraco 5. I am looking forward to starting developing new packages right away because I'm sure I'll be incredibly inspired!

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

While V5 will be exciting for many reasons, I'm mostly looking forward to working with the new API and easier creation of custom datatypes in the backend. Extensibility has always been my main attraction to Umbraco and I'm happy to get productivity improvements in the new version.

 

 

We may be bias, but we loved reading through the different session synopsis, and especially people's individual and unique reasons why they love attending CodeGarden and what they are anticipating most about the new version 5 release.... one of the main focus' of this years conference. If you have yet to purchase your ticket, head over to the Umbraco site, there are limited tickets left. Once you've secured one, come back here and leave a comment telling us what YOU are looking forward to most at CG11.


Warren & the Umbraco HQ.

Monday, May 16, 2011 by Warren Buckley

Those of you who have been onto the CodeGarden 11 website would have seen and possibly already signed up on the session information and time table page. We know with so many top notch speakers presenting awesome and informative sessions, it's going to be hard to choose.. To make it a little easier (or possibly harder...) we've asked a few of the CodeGarden11 speakers a couple of questions about who they are and what they'll be presenting on.

Niels Hartvig

Niels-Hartvig

Q: So this year you are doing several sessions at CodeGarden on version 5 of Umbraco, can you tell us what the sessions will be about?

A: My sessions will show how big an effort we've put into making existing v4 lovers feel at home. This has been one of the promises from the very beginning and the core team has done an incredible job of following through and I get the easy job of showing their great work. I'm also doing an intro session on MVC which is mainly targeted at designers/web developers who are looking for reusable MVC patterns to use when they go back and build websites.

Q: What are you most looking forward to, at this years CodeGarden?

A: Meeting old friends and introducing new people to the cozy yet serious atmosphere that makes CodeGarden so special. And of course giving the MVPs a big hug on stage.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: Even though we're not done yet, I can't wait to show the amazing progress. With v5 the core team has built an amazing foundation for the next five years which lets us move forward at an incredible pace. It's the version of Umbraco that I dreamed of building but never had the skills to pull off. As such, a wonderful proof of the power of open source!

Peter Gregory

peter-gregory

Q: So this year yourself and Paul Sterling are presenting a session at CodeGarden, titled "Introduction to Deli" can you tell us a little about Deli and what we can learn at your session?

A: Deli is the new Umbraco marketplace where the Umbraco community will have the ability to buy and sell commercial Umbraco products.  Our session will provide developers with all the information they will need to get started licencing and selling their packages.

Q: What are you most looking forward to at this years CodeGarden?

A: This is a pivotal year in the life of Umbraco with the upcoming release of V5, there is a sense of excitement and anticipation in the air and I believe it will be the one not to miss.  It is a chance to collaborate and socialise with what I think is one of the friendliest developer communities around.

Alex Norcliffe

Alex-Norcliffe

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden, titled "0 to hive in 45" can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: In researching and designing the architecture of v5 over the past year, one huge common denominator was always the way we treat data in projects. The sources of data, and their quantity, have changed a lot over the past few years, to the point where an average website is legitimately a collection of data from all over the place: for example Twitter, a Flickr feed, an existing image management system, and of course the CMS itself. Hive is all about enabling a configurable way of plugging that content into the underbelly of Umbraco 5, and still leave editing and templating it as friendly as ever.

Q: What are you most looking forward to, at this years CodeGarden?

A: I'm excited about the team being able to shed light on all the work we've been doing on version 5 and getting those focused and creative discussions going that only CodeGarden can provide.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

A: Being at the coalface for many months means there's too many exciting things to list, but I know I'm looking forward to seeing what funky things people create with the tools we've built into version 5.

Shannon Deminick

shannon-deminick

Q: So this year you are doing a session at CodeGarden, titled "Get Plugged into Jupiter" can you tell us what the session will be about?

A: Jupiter's (the codename for V5) back-office has been re-engineered from the ground up with extensibility as a primary focus. My session will be about all of the great new ways to extend the Umbraco back-office by way of Plugins. Nearly all of Jupiter's back-office functionality is driven by Plugins, from context menu items to the editors you see in the right editor panel. In my session I'll be reviewing all of the different types of Plugins and their structure, the basics on how to create all of them, then a deep dive on creating a more complex one from the ground up and getting it installed.

Q: What are you most looking forward to, at this years CodeGarden?

A: I can't wait to meet up with everyone I've met from the previous years and actually meet all of the people on Twitter that I only know through the Interwebs. Most importantly for me, I'm looking forward to learning and sharing ideas with all of the smart people in this community.

Q: What is the most exciting thing for you about the upcoming V5 release?

I'm really looking forward to helping developers get started with creating packages for Jupiter. I'm hoping that the new framework will make it a breeze for them to create amazing new add-ons. I've already had a few requests for how to get started so hopefully we'll have a few Jupiter packages ready to go before CG11!

So if you haven't booked your ticket to CodeGarden yet, then what are you waiting for go and sort it out now.

Here at the Umbraco HQ, we love hearing from you all, so why not tell us what your most looking forward to at CodeGarden or the upcoming V5 release in the comments below.

Wednesday, May 04, 2011 by Niels Hartvig

mix11195946

As you've may seen, I was given the awesome chance of appearing in the keynote at this years Microsoft MIX '11 conference. It was an amazing (and terrifying) experience and a milestone beyond what anyone in the project had dreamt possible (except for Sir Paul Sterling who made it happen!).

People who've met me knows, that there's (almost) nothing I love more than talking about Umbraco and I'm proud to be representing such an awesome project at various conferences. But a keynote at the biggest Microsoft event for web developers was enormous and I wanted to find a great way to show that this project is a true team effort and not an ego one. At the same way it was a great chance to thank the ones who believed the project when it was 10% great idea and 90% bugs. So the respect tee was born and I wore it with pride during the 4 minutes and 30 seconds of fame…

The Respect tee - Design by Tore Rosbo

Credit where due

Today Umbraco is a well known and proved platform, but it hasn't always been that way. Years ago it was nothing but an idea and some pretty bad code (at one point even written in ASP Classic and VB6 COM objects!) written in a tiny flat in Copenhagen, Denmark. But for some reason a bunch of people and a few agencies could see the potential and believed me when I said "come and participate, it could be awesome.".

These are the types of people on the Tee above. The agencies who early on brought clients, the developers who contributed to the source, the community people who devoted a ton of their time to introduce new people to the platform. The seeds. The Umbraco DNA.

They are (in the random order they appear on the Tee):

  • Thomas Madsen-Mygdal. An old friend and inspiration. The guy who introduced me to the crazy phenomenon "Open Source" and who talked about transparency and participatory culture before it got devaluated into buzzwords.
  • Anders Pollas. The first guy (except me) to do an implementation on Umbraco. Poor guy. That wasn't easy, but he was patient and kept coming back with ideas and also contributed to the first starter kit back when we proudly released Umbraco 2.0 (David Hasselhoff, anyone?)
  • Kasper Bumbech: The guy who really introduced me to a better way of doing .NET dev and a lead driver in porting Umbraco to .NET. Before Kasper I was still convinced that the best place to do business logic was in sprocs. Imagine that.
  • Ebita. A Copenhagen based agency who were among the first to believe in Umbraco for their clients and the first company to contribute directly to the source. And the company who hired me at a point where I would have gone broke if it wasn't for them
  • Per Ploug Krogslund. The artist formerly known as Per Ploug Hansen and the first employee in the HQ (now partner). I'm so lucky you came. If it wasn't for you, the project wouldn't be where it is today.
  • DGU. The first major client on Umbraco and my biggest client when I tried to finance Umbraco dev doing implementation. The probably regretted it as the project really was a mess, but their big ambitions with their site made Umbraco ambitious too.
  • Douglas Robar. Umbraco MVP all years. This guy needs no introduction. A warmer, more patient and friendly guy doesn't really exist. I'd love him even without his EOS.
  • 1508. The other agency who believed in Umbraco even before it was completed. They've been generously giving advice, they've contributed, they've brought amazing clients and last year we became a client as they did our new identity.
  • Jesper Ordrup. MVP Followed Umbraco before it was released. His teasing blog posts and comments followed every announcement where I had to postpone the release of Umbraco and was super motivating. MVP in 2007 and producer of some of the first packages for Umbraco. And he's still around.
  • Thomas Höhler. His claim to fame might be as "The Grillmeister", but like Jesper he was among the first to contribute packages to Umbraco and also a 2007 MVP. He's also around still and even started doing official Umbraco training in Germany this year!
  • Dirk DeGrave. MVP 2008, 2009 and 2010. Still today the guy who've replied to most posts in the forum. A big inspiration for many who've learned that contributing by sharing knowledge is as crucial to Umbraco as creating packages.
  • Lee Kelleher. 2010 MVP and an instrumental part of the Umbraco community today. In building an Umbraco ecosystem in the UK, in contributing with packages and in replying to forum posts. A role model for any 2011-Umbracian.
  • Richard Soeteman. 2010 MVP and the Dutch package monster. An inspiration for realizing that Umbraco could also be a commercial platform for indie package developers.
  • Morten Bock. 2009 MVP. This guy is like an Umbraco cork. He surfaces and disappears (due to workload). But when he surfaces he brings amazing constructive criticism and great input on how Umbraco can be improved for developers relying on the platform.
  • Warren Buckley. Aka the Creative Website Starter. An alltime Umbraco MVP (2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010) and the creator of the most popular way to learn Umbraco for frontend devs.
  • Matt Brailsford. Contrary to the rest on the list, he hasn't been around always. He popped out of nowhere last year but quickly became known by everyone for he's incredible number of packages (and their incredible usefulness and quality). He's known as the Karminator and you only need to look at the chart of highest ranked people on Our Umbraco to realize why.
  • Morten Christensen. Creator of the Google Analytics and Default Values packages that for many is among the most essential ones to Umbraco dev (and why some people still begin new development on 4.5.2 - when is that upgrade coming, Morten!). Also the main driver in the efforts of building the Danish Umbraco community
  • Paul Sterling. The guy leading the US operations and instrumental in keeping things professional in the HQ while understanding that our casual tone is an essential part of our DNA. I can't count how many fires he has had to extinguish because of me and my bad European habits.
  • Aaron Powell. The one half of the Australian Code Mafia(tm) and a guy who dared put his own rumor on stake in the efforts of improving the core of Umbraco at a time where most .NET developers thought it was more constructive to stultify.
  • Shannon Deminick. The other half of the Australian Code Mafia(tm). Like Aaron he dared to go places in the core where no others would risk going and the quality of the current core gained a significant jump with his contributions. Also one of the founders of the uComponents project which really should be default in any Umbraco install.
  • Tim Geyssens. Was on the first ever Umbraco course (that I teached) and I remembered how this awesome Belgian guy just got the Umbraco way of thinking. From there it went fast as he became a 2008 and 2009 MVP due to his continuous blogging and packaging efforts and in late summer 2009 he became the 3rd employee in Umbraco.
  • Casey Neehouse. As an MVP in 2007 and 2008 he helped countless people back when the Umbraco community was nothing but dreams and an Yahoo mailinglist and also the creator of Doc2Form. Unfortunately, my ego scared him away in end of 2008 but luckily the story got a happy ending this year when my ego calmed down and Casey returned now in the form of an HQ employee. A proof that nothing is impossible in the world of Umbraco
  • Peter Gregory. Have spend tireless efforts in promoting Umbraco down under. Despite being a kiwi he has know moved to Australia and joined the HQ where he'll lead our efforts in making Umbraco even more known
  • Alex Norcliffe. Our lead architect on Umbraco 5 (aka JUPITER) who is a rare bread that respects and listens to people who implement websites and try to balance the need for keeping it easy while giving the core of Umbraco the most beautiful architecture known to man. Seriously, this guy needs to cope with me on a day to day basis. That alone is something!
  • Gregory Roekens. CTO of Wunderman London and the guy that called me up a Friday evening in 2007 while I was cooking dinner to let me know that http://www.peugeot.com would move to Umbraco. I was baffled. It was that evening and because of that call I finally realized we were on to something. I remember the whole scene as if it was yesterday.
  • Lars Buur. My first real boss. Hired me straight out of high school in 1998 to work on the first Danish CMS (Site In A Box(!)), despite I knew nothing about databases or ASP. He later told me that it was my Delphi knowledge that got me the job. If it wasn't for Lars (and the co-founder of the company Thomas Christensen) I wouldn't have known about CMS, maybe I wouldn't even had gone into web dev and I for sure wouldn't have been 'raised' in an environment so packaged with an 'everything is possible' attitude.

So that's the twenty. The MVPs, the biggest core contributors, the early adopters and motivators. Making a v2.0 of this tee would be impossible. Even a 6pt font size on a XXXL couldn't fit the names of the people driving Umbraco forward today. But the project is standing on the shoulders of these fine people. If you meet them, give them a hug and a high five! It's easy to recognize them if they wear the t-shirt. It's exclusively made for them. A very limited edition for a very rare group of special people.

Love and godspeed Umbraco!